2013 IABC St. Louis Quill Awards

http://iabcstl.org/2013-iabc-st-louis-quill-awards/

Call for Entries Now Open!

You did the work, now earn recognition for excellence in business communication. Show your colleagues your outstanding work and add value to your business and clients with a St. Louis Quill award.

All IABC St. Louis Quill entries are judged by top communicators nationally. You can be very proud of what you’ve accomplished.

You don’t have to be a member to enter. The competition is open to all area business communicators who completed a significant project in 2012. Choose to enter one of 27 categories across three primary divisions: communication management, communication skills and creative.

Winning entries feature clear objectives supporting the organization’s goals, creative communication strategies and effective, measurable results.

How to Enter

The call for entries brochure contains all the details you need on which categories to enter and how to prepare your entry.

Eligibility

Bronze Quill is open to all communications professionals, including freelancers and those working in agencies, nonprofit organizations or corporations. You do NOT have to be an IABC member to enter the competition or attend the awards gala, but members do receive a discount for entry prices.

Deadlines

  • Early Bird (discount) entries: Friday, March 1, 2013
  • Final entry deadline: Thursday, March 21, 2013
  • IABC St. Louis Quill celebration: Thursday, May 30

Presenting Sponsor:

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Source: IABC St. Louis
John Twombly, Awards Chair
(314) 286-0417
jjt1320@bjc.org

Upcoming Free Webinar

http://iabcstl.org/upcoming-free-webinar/

Managing Communications During a Time of Crisis — February 1, 2013

IABC Pacific Plains Region presents an hour-long webinar with a seasoned crisis communications pro, Michael Freitag a partner with strategic communications firm Joele Frank of New York.

February 1, 2013
12 noon Central

IABC Pacific Plains Region Webinar
Managing communications during a time of crisis
with Michael Freitag, Partner, Joele Frank, New York

At a moment’s notice, an organization can find itself facing an unexpected, out-of-the-ordinary event that threatens a company’s operations and public and internal perception. As communicators, how do we best take control of our message when our company’s back is seemingly up against a wall?

For more information, check out IABC Pacific Plains Region Webinar information.

Engaging Employees via Mobile Communications

http://iabcstl.org/engaging-employees-via-mobile-communications/

by Jonathan Erwin

Have you ever heard an employee or co-worker say, “I wish our company would stop communicating with me?” Not likely, right? Instead, employees praise companies that keep them in the loop, and gripe and moan when they feel like they were the last to know an important piece of information. How can communicators make sure we consistently communicate with employees, particularly those who are not in a central location?

Quite simply, by communicating with employees about what they want to know—when and where they are most likely to receive that information. Mobile communication has the potential to break the cycle of misinformed and disengaged employees.

As consumers, we are living in a time of unprecedented electronic exposure. Marketers, spammers, social platforms, banner ads, retailers, family, partners and employers all have access to our inboxes, devices, social media profiles and desktops.

But guess what? Most consumers are also employees. If organizations are willing to invest so heavily in mobile and online marketing to attract and engage customers, and if they truly believe marketing will influence sales, they should be investing equally in internal marketing, or employee engagement.

A recent Harvard Business Review article, “The Silent Killer of Big Companies,” detailed the devastating losses that large corporations are suffering due to a lack of clear and concise internal and employee communication. Successful companies are engaging employees by adopting communication methods that bring them closer to employees, promote dialogue and raise employees’ understanding of the company’s strategic initiatives.

Read more

Not Marketing for Mobile Yet? Time to Get Moving

http://iabcstl.org/not-marketing-for-mobile-yet-time-to-get-moving/

by Rich Barber

The magic of mobile marketing lies in the fact that people are seldom separated from their mobile phones. Like Gollum and the One Ring in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, people are loath to be away from their precious technology, which keeps them connected to the world and provides them with timely information.

In the old days, advertisers could only reach people in their homes, their cars and their offices by television, radio, direct mail, billboards, etc. Now, they can reach them anywhere—when they’re shopping, going out to eat, sitting in a dentist’s office or at a ball game. The major advantage mobile advertisers have is that they are reaching people who often already have their wallets out, ready to buy something. The only thing then is to convince them to spend the money at your restaurant, barber shop, paint store or flower shop—and the closer they are to you, the better.

Read more

Mobilizing Your Marketing: Integrating mobile into your mix

http://iabcstl.org/mobilizing-your-marketing-integrating-mobile-into-your-mix/

by Kent Lewis

Since 2006, I’ve predicted that the “Year of Mobile” was upon us. Rather than lose faith and look to another trend to promote, I do believe this next year is truly going to be the “Year of Mobile.” For those of you who want to get a jump on mobile marketing, I’ve outlined a few key areas on which to focus your efforts.

Mobilizing your website
As with any effective online marketing effort, your website should be the primary focus. Corporate marketers have a few options when it comes to mobilizing a website. The easiest and most cost-effective approach is to develop a mobile-friendly website, designed in CSS, which considers small screens in the design. The site should render nearly as well on a phone screen as on a monitor, if designed correctly. The drawback is that mobile browsers are not as robust and do not typically support Flash or Javascript elements, but HTML 5 provides a viable alternative for interactivity.

Read more

December Luncheon: Charity Brainstorm Bash!

http://iabcstl.org/december-luncheon-charity-brainstorm-bash/

The holiday season is officially upon us! It’s also a time when everyone starts thinking of ways to give back.

This year, IABC St. Louis is turning its December luncheon event on its head – and you’re invited to help!  And the best part is, it’s for two great causes.

Join us for this unique opportunity to give back with your professional expertise and creativity. Representatives from two worthy organizations – Headway Clubhouse and Diversity Awareness Partnership – will join us to share a particular communications challenge their organization faces.

Then, you will divide into brainstorming teams, discuss the issue, and come up with solutions. You will then compile your ideas into a pre-formatted template. At the end of the session, you’ll deliver a simple, actionable communications plan to each organization on the spot!

It’s fun, creative and a unique way for you to help nonprofits in our area during the holidays. Plus, it’s the perfect way to connect with other communicators while enjoying lunch at Ces and Judy’s. 

All profits from the event will be donated to Headway Clubhouse and Diversity Awareness Partnership.

We hope you’ll join us to help us help these worthy causes!

When: Thursday, December 13, 11:30 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

Where: Ces and Judy’s, 10405 Clayton Road, St. Louis, MO 63131

Meeting fees:
$30 – members
$40 – nonmembers
$20 – students

Click here to register!

Learn more about the two nonprofits you’ll be helping!

 

 

In the aftermath of Sandy, communication starts with sensitivity

http://iabcstl.org/in-the-aftermath-of-sandy-communication-starts-with-sensitivity/

According to crisis experts, communication with constituents during the initial stages of a crisis is critical — and will be remembered. It can be tricky for organizations to balance a sense of urgency or basic pragmatism with sensitivity.

JPMorgan Chase bank showed a kinder side to its customers by letting them know about its decision to waive fees. A note went out to Chase customers before the storm and a follow-up note was posted to the Chase website . The latest note starts out in this way:

Read more>>>

November Event: Mercy’s Crisis Communications Response to the Joplin Tornado

http://iabcstl.org/november-event-mercy%e2%80%99s-crisis-communications-response-to-the-joplin-tornado/

On May 22, 2011, disaster struck Joplin, Missouri, when a catastrophic Category 5 tornado ripped through the small town. The destruction was swift, but so was the response.

From the very onset of the disaster, Mercy Hospital’s team coordinated an intense network of communications both internally and externally. From national media coverage to communication with on-the-street personnel, the Mercy team deftly executed their crisis plan.

  • Get the inside story on how they executed it.
  • What did they do first?
  • How did they coordinate so much with such chaos around them?

Plus, you’ll hear about the philanthropic activities and communication that have occurred since that fateful day, including a major gift announcement and the filming of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.

Hear firsthand how Mercy navigated this crisis and pick up tips that you can use to hone your own crisis communications plan…efore the day you really need it.

When: Thursday, November 15, 7:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Where: The Center of Clayton, 50 Gay Avenue, Clayton, MO 63105

Meeting fees: $30 – members, $40 – nonmembers, $20 – students

Register Now: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?llr=klve7pkab&oeidk=a07e6krgy6nc740d3f8&oseq=

About Our Presenters:

Barb Meyer, Vice President of Marketing and Communications

As the Vice President of Marketing and Communications, Barb is responsible for all media relations for Mercy Health System. She will cover in depth the crisis communications response in Joplin immediately following the tornado and in the year after.

Nancy G. Schnoebelen, Director of Advancement Communications

As Director of Advancement Communications, Nancy manages Mercy’s philanthropic communications. She’ll be discussing the efforts following the tornado to raise philanthropic support for the rebuilding in Joplin.

Gamification: Engaging employees one game at a time

http://iabcstl.org/gamification-engaging-employees-one-game-at-a-time/

by Jeremy Henderson

There is a new word buzzing around the halls of Silicon Valley: gamification. Simply put, gamification is the infusion of gaming elements into business to create a fun, entertaining engagement experience for employees or customers. The broad interpretation of the term lends itself to infusion into any brand or web property that effectively converts users into players. Over the past several years, the incorporation of gaming elements into non-gaming websites has become one of the most important movements in technology.

Read more>>>

Putting the Fun into the Fundamentals of Effective Communication

http://iabcstl.org/putting-the-fun-into-the-fundamentals-of-effective-communication/

by Kathryn Yates and Adam Wootton, Ph.D.

The screen at the airport flashes up the inevitable delayed announcement as the storm clouds continue to roll in through the evening. However, in the waiting area, the response is muted. Sharply dressed businesspeople sit glued to their iPads, a child wins another level of Angry Birds and the flight attendant silently gloats over the killer word she just played in Words With Friends.

The U.S. has over 100 million mobile phone games; half are played every day. It is easy to forget that the iPhone (which revolutionized mobile gaming) has been around for only five years. In this time, the way we communicate has been revolutionized with the adoption of mobile and social technologies. But, it is games that have really captured the hearts (and wallets) of users.

While the past five years have been a tough time for many businesses, not so for gaming. At the same time as the corporate world has been forced to tighten its belt, employees have begun to use new and exciting techniques for communication and entertainment. However, there are easy and efficient ways organizations can bring games and gamification to corporate communication, which can massively increase the attention we, as communicators, get from employees.

Read more>>>